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Resources for Decolonizing Your Teaching

This list offers resources to support a path towards decolonizing our teaching.

Land Acknowledgements

*Consider what an acknowledgement means to you and write your own. Queen’s offers workshops on this. 

Canadian Association of University Teachers. (2017). Guide to acknowledging First Peoples and traditional territory. Ottawa: Canadian Association of University Teachers. 

"The goal of this guide is to encourage all academic staff association representatives and members to acknowledge the First Peoples on whose traditional territories we live and work. This acknowledgement appropriately takes place at the commencement of courses, meetings or conferences, and presentations (given either at one’s home institution or elsewhere). Acknowledging territory shows recognition of and respect for Aboriginal Peoples. It is recognition of their presence both in the past and the present. Recognition and respect are essential elements of establishing healthy, reciprocal relations. These relationships are key to reconciliation, a process to which CAUT is committed.

Vowel, C. (23 September, 2016). Beyond territorial acknowledgements. âpihtawikosisân.com Blog: Law, Language, Culture. 

"First, what is the purpose of these acknowledgments? Both what those making the territorial acknowledgments say they intend, as well as what Indigenous peoples think may be the purpose. Second, what can we learn about the way these acknowledgments are delivered? Are there best practices? Third, in what spaces do these acknowledgements happen and more importantly, where are they not found? Finally, what can exist beyond territorial acknowledgements?"

Key Reading

Robinson, D., Hill, J., Ruffo, A., Couture, S., & Ravensbergen, L. (2019). Rethinking the practice and performance of Indigenous land acknowledgementCanadian Theatre Review, 177(1), 20–30.

Consult Queen's Four Directions Acknowledgement of Territory for a statement of the purpose of the acknowledgement and what to include.

Consult Stones: Exploring Kingston's Social History to learn about Kingston's past and its many cultural communities. Each marker on the map below explores a site of interest in Kingston.